30 September 2015

The Gilded Hour

The Gilded HourThe Gilded Hour by Sara Donati
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The gilded hour is that liminal time after the sun has set and before all the light has faded - a time to contemplate the day, and plan for the next.  The Gilded Hour, set in 1883, illuminates the lives of intersecting families - a thoughtful but realistic police officer who is the son of Italian-Jewish immigrants, two women doctors - cousins - whose struggles to find acceptance and respect are complicated by love and the evil of ignorance, and four Italian orphans who are separated by forces that may be accepted in the eyes of society, but that do not stand up to loving scrutiny.

The sheer detail of this long, dense, vivid book is one of its joys. Nothing - not the last stages of the Brooklyn Bridge, the ferry rides to an unimaginably rural Staten Island, the splendor of the Vanderbilt mansions, the hideous squalor of the streets - is wasted; all of it brings you into the story, breathless and fearful, joyful and expectant. The two cousins, one a Free Woman of Color, struggle against the medical mainstream as well as the forces of Anthony Comstock, which would deny women even the most basic understanding of their bodies and choices. That they accomplish what the do is simply amazing. Even the recent national history is important, as choices made during the Civil War continue to resound through the lives of every New Yorker.

I wish there were more than five stars to award. I learned so much from this book, and I came to love the characters so much. It's going to be hard to wait for the next book in the series.

Thank you, Goodreads, for giving me a copy of this book in exchange for a fair review.

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I stand with Planned Parenthood

23 September 2015

A Curious Beginning

 A Curious Beginning (Veronica Speedwell Mystery, #1)A Curious Beginning by Deanna Raybourn
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Veronica Speedwell is curious, indeed.

If you combine the scientific curiosity of Maisie Dobbs, the adventurous spirit of Beryl Markham, and the headstrong courage of Flavia de Luce, you won't come close to the vitality of Veronica Speedwell. This young woman has established herself as a world-class lepidopterist, travelling the globe with her butterfly net, a sharpened hatpin, and a carefully-packed carpetbag. She is alone, sure-footed, and satisfied.

As this novel opens, Veronica has attended the funeral of her guardian, and has scandalized the vicar's wife (whilst drinking tea, "properly strong... I abhorred weakness of any kind, but most particularly in my tea") and planned to embark on new adventures, both scientific and amatory. Her disinclination toward the traditional Victorian woman's life is extreme, and she pities the woman who tries to fix her up with a widower: "It is not your fault that you are entirely devoid of imagination," she tells the sputtering vicaress, "I blame your education."  Indeed.

However, mysterious and nefarious forces have combined to snuff that idea, if not Veronica herself. In a matter of days, she is nearly abducted, thrown onto the unwilling protection of a handsome but surly natural scientist, and forced to flee London with the brilliant brute to join a travelling circus. Why do these evildoers want her? What is there about her background that makes her so dangerous? And does the mystery have anything to do with Queen Victoria's upcoming Golden Jubilee?

Veronica and Stoker (the brute) are such a well-matched and appealing couple that this new series will undoubtedly be thrilling and satisfying. I recommend Veronica's maiden voyage (as it were) to anyone who enjoys a cracking good time in the presence of thoroughly enjoyable characters.

I was given an ARC of this book by NetGalley in exchange for a fair review.

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01 September 2015

The Lemoncholy Life of Annie Aster

The Lemoncholy Life of Annie AsterThe Lemoncholy Life of Annie Aster by Scott Wilbanks
My rating: 5 of 5 stars
This book has everything that I love: magic, time-travel, letter-writing, unusual characters who find each other and form a loving little community, wit, intelligence, historical verisimilitude, and smatterings of quoted Tolkien.

I often say "If you liked The Night Circus..." - I'll say it again.

Utterly delightful. I read it in two days, and will read it again.

Thank you, NetGalley, for the ARC. This is a fair (and exuberant) review.

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25 August 2015

Swans of Fifth Avenue

The Swans of Fifth AvenueThe Swans of Fifth Avenue by Melanie Benjamin
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Sometimes, even the wealthiest, most glamorous, most fêted superstar feels like a motherless child. Once Bobolink (Babe Paley) and True Heart (Truman Capote)were introduced, they were soulmates because their mothers, although present, were emotional bullies, leaving empty spaces and empty rooms that the socialite and the flamboyantly gay writer could fill with confidences and true vulnerability.

They met before Capote's success with Breakfast at Tiffany's. She and her husband welcomed him into their world and opened themselves to him even more than to each other - only Truman was allowed to see Babe's unpainted, scarred face. Not her husband, William Paley, nor CZ Guest, Slim Hawks, Gloria Guinness, Pamela Harrison, or any other the other glittering socialites had a clue about the renowned beauty's inner insecurities. From party to party, social event to lavish vacation, Truman and the Paleys partied and gossiped and lived the life of true excess that filled newspaper columns about the rich and famous.

How did it all go so wrong? After In Cold Blood, Truman faced a writer's block so deep that only excesses of drugs, alcohol, and Studio 54 could distract him. Although his beloved Babe was succumbing to lung cancer, he used the materials he had gathered - the gossip, innuendo, backstories - and exposed Babe and her circle in a story he published in "Esquire" - “La Côte Basque 1965” - destroying the illusion of their beautiful lives, and, effectively, committing social suicide.

Almost everyone in this book is seedy, gossipy, and unpleasant. Benjamin captures the rhythm of their language (especially Capote's) and the spectacle of their lives so well that you only realize afterwards that you have just read about truly awful people. The planning and execution of Capote's Black and White Ball are especially vivid, especially when the younger celebrities such as Mia Farrow and Penelope Tree leave with Frank Sinatra and the party collapses.

Four and 1/2 stars - close to completely enchanting.

I received this book as an e-ARC from NetGalley, and this is a fair review.

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21 August 2015

The Haunted Season

The Haunted Season: A Max Tudor Mystery (A Max Tudor Mystery, #5)The Haunted Season: A Max Tudor Mystery by G.M. Malliet
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I was a little disappointed. Not that Max and the residents of Nether Monkslip are any less fun to read about -- their squabbles, their power-plays, their baking... -- but there were so many characters in this outing that they quite blanketed the murder. Still, it was fun to read about the annual Duck Race (not that they race actual ducks, you understand), the internecine doings of the village ladies, and the Baaden-Boomethistles - lord and lady of Totleigh Hall, with the utterly perfect Dowager, a combination of Barbara Cartland and "Downton Abbey"'s Countess Violet.

I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley.

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18 August 2015

Wylding Hall

Wylding HallWylding Hall by Elizabeth Hand
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Elizabeth Hand channels the summer of 1972, deep in an ancient English forest, where five young musicians are secluded from the world, creating their masterpiece. Their Child ballads, mystical and mythic original lyrics, virtuoso musicianship, and sense of wonder have been disorganized and derailed by the death of their lovely lead singer. Their manager thinks that Leslie, with her strong voice and lyrical skills, will energize the music and the remaining members of Windhollow Faire.

Wylding Hall reveals itself as a portal to very old magic, perhaps older than the perspective-bending barrow deep in the woods. By the time the young musicians record the album during a spontaneous outdoors session - photographed haphazardly by a young teenager with his first Instamatic - each member has been wounded by a mystery, and has discovered uncanny links to past tragedies. Have they also seen a ghost?

The short novel is structured as the transcript of a 21st century documentary, narrated in turns by each of the band members and participants - all but one, the beautiful, brilliant Julian, whose disappearance decades before was linked to a very strange young girl, and a very strange melody...

Did you enjoy Uprooted by Naomi Novik? Do you eagerly await the work of Charles de Lint or Pamela Dean or Terri Windling? Does your playlist include Loreena McKennitt, Pentangle, Steeleye Span, or Fairport Convention? This is your book. Anyone who loves folk-tinged fantasy will love it too. The only thing that will disappoint you: there is no soundtrack. Maybe someone will put together a Spotify list.

I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley.

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17 July 2015

Go set a watchman

Go Set a WatchmanGo Set a Watchman by Harper Lee
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

Go Set a Watchman is not a novel. It’s a series of sketches that happen to use the same names and locale as To Kill a Mockingbird -- it includes several chapters that do nothing to advance anything, a few charming flashbacks to scenes with Jem and Dill, some gut-wrenching pages-and-pages of the most vile, racist stuff (being spoken by various people, including Atticus), & a spot of humor. As a book, its purpose is totally, totally different.

It should have been part of Lee’s papers, cataloged in some library, and accessible to scholars or other curious folk who wanted to see how the famous book began. Publishing it as a novel is just.plain.wrong.

And now there might be a third? oy.

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10 July 2015


For today, I just want to share a video - partly because I keep watching it, partly because I want you all to marvel, too. 

Clearly, we do not give enough credit to many, many people, and creatures. 

O, wonder!
How many goodly creatures are there here!
How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world,
That has such people in't!

The Tempest (V, i)

08 July 2015

The Painted Bridge

The Painted Bridge: A NovelThe Painted Bridge: A Novel by Wendy Wallace
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Newlywed Anna Palmer, haunted from childhood by dreams and visions of a drowning boy, is committed to the Lake House Asylum for women by her husband, mere weeks after their marriage.  He uses her sudden trip to help the victims of a shipwreck as his excuse. What normal woman in 1859 would do such a thing without first asking her husband's permission?

Before we meet Anna, however, we are confronted with the inverted image of another patient, Lizzie Button. Dr. Lucas St. Clair is photographing the patients and hoping that the new art form will form the basis of a reliable, scientific method of diagnosing madness.

It soon becomes clear that the director, Querios Abse, has no insight into his own troubled family, and not a trace of good intentions towards his patients. Neither do most of the caretakers, whose behaviors range from moderate kindness to stark brutality. While some of the patients are ill, others have been dumped by families who found them inconvenient. Querios's own daughter is starving herself to death while quoting from "Aurora Leigh" and trying to emulate a carnival attraction named The Fasting Girl, who supposedly lives on "drops of dew, brushed onto her lips with a feather."

While the reader never questions Anna's sanity, others do. The treatments she endures are both horrific and historically accurate: purges, chairs that whirl, isolation. They nearly unhinge Anna, who wonders anew at the visions and dreams that have given others license to support her husband's decisions. But who wouldn't begin to lose faith, imprisoned in a torture chamber and seemingly forgotten by the world?

I am giving this book four-and-a-half stars instead of five, only because the villains are depicted without a touch of nuance, and at least one major character is a touch too saintly. But I do, most definitely, recommend it as a story with atmosphere, ideas, insight, and a plot that will keep you engrossed.

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07 July 2015

The Other Daughter

The Other DaughterThe Other Daughter by Lauren Willig
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Rachel always thought her father was a botanist who died while he was away on a trip. Throughout her childhood, her mother maintained them as a respectable, if poor family. At the beginning of this engaging novel, Rachel has returned from seven years as a governess in France to find that her mother, dead of influenza, has kept secrets from her, secrets that change her life in ways she could never have dreamed: her father is neither dead nor a botanist. He is an earl - and he has another daughter!

Despite her loving cousin's protests, Rachel's feelings of betrayal lead her to concoct a scheme of revenge with Simon Montford, a handsome gossip columnist who has his own reasons to want to hurt the earl - and the other daughter. Their adventures amongst the glitterati of Jazz Age London and the earl's family change many lives, and will entertain the reader throughout.    

I received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for a fair review.I also received a copy of the book from St. Martin's Press. Thanks to both!

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03 July 2015

Circling the Sun

Circling the SunCircling the Sun by Paula McLain
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Early in this novel, young English expatriate Beryl Markham (nee Clutterbuck) is almost eaten by a lion. Paddy is kept on a neighbor's property and considered tame, but her father knows better: "he can only be exactly what he is, what his nature dictates, and nothing else." She already has been abandoned in Kenya by her mother, taught more about horses than society by her father, and befriended by a Kipsigi warrior and his son, Kibii.

She longs to be a warrior, too, but has been told it is impossible for a girl. Besides, says her friend, no one would ever know about her triumphs. "I would," she says. "Where's the glory in that?" he asks.

Young Beryl goes on to achieve many bold triumphs, and the world comes to know them. She becomes the first woman to be certified as a horse trainer (and thoroughbred breeder, with Kibii, now a warrior named Ruta). She becomes the first professional female pilot in Africa. Like the lion whose scars she bears, she can be sociable, she can do what others expect, but she can not deny her own wild nature -- not in the world of horses, not in the air, and not in love.

Thrice-married, she and Karen Blixen formed two sides of a love triangle with the doomed aviator, Denys Finch Hatton, whose death drove Karen Blixen back to Denmark, where she became Isak Dinesen and enchanted the world with Out of Africa. His death drove Beryl into the sky, where this novel begins, as she becomes the first person to fly solo across the Atlantic from east to west.

Much of the novel takes place in and around Nairobi during the 1920s. The Happy Valley expatriates are contrasted with the lives of the farmers, animal breeders, and hunters who claimed the land for England. They may have been fooled if they they thought Africa could be tamed. Like the hungry lion, land and people will always retain their true and best nature.

The reader will be entranced, horrified, and engaged fully while reading this book - and after.

I received this book as an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for a fair review, and in physical form from Random House. Thanks to both. 

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27 June 2015

The Mysterious Disappearance of the Reluctant Book Fairy

The Mysterious Disappearance of the Reluctant Book FairyThe Mysterious Disappearance of the Reluctant Book Fairy by Elizabeth  George
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Annapurna (a/k/a Janet) is a librarian with a Special Ability. Mildred is an Indomitable Force. Add one indie bookstore with money woes, adventure-seekers with deep pockets, a best friend who can't keep a secret, and a dollop of literary opinions. Voilà - fifty pages that will leave you laughing and yearning for a friend named Annapurna.

Janet has always been able to lose herself in a story. Literally. Not as a character, already written, but as a participating extra. As a sickly child, she drank tea alongside Alice in Wonderland, tried on Cinderalla's slippers, and climbed down Rapunzel's hair. Her secret was never meant to be public. Ah, but after she settled an argument with her talkative friend by transporting her to a pivotal scene beneath an oak tree in To Kill a Mockingbird, she became a very popular girl indeed.

Years later, she has long eschewed her talent, and has spent 15 years travelling the country in a school bus with folks who want to duplicate "Priscilla, Queen of the Desert." Her now-married friend, Monie, entices her back to her hometown; a library job is the lure, but a desire for temporary escapes from her dullard husband is the real motivation. Monie really, really needs a trip to the terrace at Monte Carlo where Maxim proposed to Rebecca's nameless successor. (The delicious scene with Mrs. Danvers will have to wait.)

Enter the Indomitable Force, a stalwart fundraiser for local causes. She learns about the Special Ability. Enough said.

(Janet, by the way, is not a pushover. She has always sent people into books they had not requested, because a trip on the Argo is better than a game of quidditch, n'est pas? She insists on Dracula instead of trips with glittery vampires, refuses all requests for Danielle Steel, and acquaints many with The Scarlet Pimpernel and Pemberley.)

Elizabeth George has concocted a wicked funny book, a total delight. Will you think about "Being John Malkovich" and larks by Jasper Fford? Of course. That's part of the fun.

Five stars for a book that's short, but oh, so savory.

I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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(By the way -- I played the Book Fairy in my first-grade play. I'm sure that doesn't surprise anyone...)

26 June 2015

rainbow design

Pete Seeger, bless him, always had a song for the moment.

Oh, had I a golden Thread 
And needle so fine 
I’ve weave a magic strand 
Of rainbow design 
Of rainbow design.

Thank you, Supreme Court. 
Love is love.

25 June 2015


Behold my hat, spindle, and sippy-cup of wine. 

Where were we? We were at Belmont Raceway for the inaugural gala event, Purls and Ponies - a get-together of knitters and spinners from our local Panera group, organized by Betty, with the only stipulation being : you must wear a hat. 

I must confess: wearing a hat was almost a dealbreaker for me - not because I don't like hats, not because I don't look good in hats, but because I have a small head. Proportionately small, since I am a small person. However, small enough to make it difficult to find hats that fit. 

I wanted a cloche. Impossible. Every.Single.Cloche came down to my chin.  I love hats with big, flowy brims. Forget it. I'm 4'10", and a big, flowy brim makes me look like one of the mushrooms from Fantasia, or like I should live in a house that looks like this.

Which I don't.

Anyway, we had a wonderful time, despite getting terrible, if expected, news two days before - that Lisa, who had been one of the Panera women from the start, had died.  (In memory: Lisa Grossman, The Tsock Tsarina.) We got together anyway, because that's what a a family of friends does, and it was right.

You can see how right it was from the photo, yes? 

Betty worked at Belmont for many years, so she edumacated us about reading the program and selecting horses. We ignored the edumacation, and bet on horses for all the right reasons - because the jockey's silks were purple, because the horse was named Loretta Lynn, because ooh, look at the pretty grey horsie... We had lunch, we laughed, we remembered, and we reminded each other again and again that love does go on.

(and because I know you'll all ask - I'm the one in turquoise.)

12 June 2015


UprootedUprooted by Naomi Novik
My rating: 5 of 5 stars
What Naomi Novik has created in Uprooted is a new vision from old fairy-and-folktale tropes. We have seen enchanted and malevolent forests before; likewise, the cold wizard from the stony tower who claims a young girl from a nearby village every ten years.

What we have never seen before is how the young girl challenges her selection because her beautiful friend had been groomed for the honor by her proud family, how the girl who is selected masters her own nature and changes the course of her magical training to add compassion to power, and how material corruption can be understood and transcended by the power of a woman's faithfulness.

Each of the revelations of this book follows a new logic down an old, old path. Read it with joy and astonishment.

Five stars, and straight on 'til morning.

I received this book as an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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22 April 2015

Hugo & Rose

Hugo & RoseHugo & Rose by Bridget  Foley
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

High-concept books require readers to buy into the premise - in this case, that a woman, Rose, has been dreaming about a fantastic island and playmate, Hugo, since she was recovering from an accident at age six. Every.Single.Night. The island is a whimsical affair, with sparkling pink sands, weird foes to be vanquished, and landmarks such as Castle City and the Green Lagoon. Hugo leads their adventures aboard the Plank Orb, and flying above Spider Chasm.

Rose marries Josh, a surgeon, and has three little children. Although she continues to have the dreams, she ages, as we all do, and is vaguely dissatisfied with what she calls her "sweatpants years." On the island, in her dreams, she is still beautiful and fit, as is Hugo, even though both have aged in the dreams. "Of what consequences are the dreams of housewives?" she wonders, retreating into sleep and feeling alienated from the other mothers.

Her husband and children have participated vicariously in the dream-world via the stories they have adopted as a shared mythology. They look forward to their bedtime play with the Tickle Monster, and they build a LEGO replica of the island.

Of course, the impossible becomes possible one day when she drives a carload of hungry, grumpy children to a less-travelled fast food restaurant, Orange Tastee. The cashier, against all real-world logic, is Hugo: older and less beautiful, like Rose, but unmistakable.

She is shaken - who wouldn't be? - and she begins to stalk him when her children are in school. When she decides to show herself, he recognizes her but panics. Soon, the dreams they share begin to change...

The concept is intricate, and beautifully limned. The lines between good guys and threatening entities, waking and dreaming, shared history and unique childhood traumas, are honored, even when circumstances begin to deteriorate. Many of the recurrent themes - imperiled children, the perceived shallowness of caregivers - resonate deeply. Who hasn't wished for an imaginary world and an agreeable companion?

My rating is really 3.5 stars, shading toward a generous 4. One star is subtracted because the writing sometimes slips into cumbersome, tell-don't-show pronouncements ("it played into their innate desires for self-reliance") that are annoying and spell-breaking, especially after a well-written passage of show-don't-tell. Another half-star would be subtracted because Rose's husband is just too, too patient. But it's a good and diverting read, and a fine first novel.

I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a fair review.

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16 April 2015

The Robot Scientist's Daughter

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Many of the poems in this book are iterations of the poet's own life. Jeannine Hall Gailey spent her childhood in Tennessee, in the shadow of her father's workplace, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, incubator and nursery to nuclear experiments that included the bomb dropped on Hiroshima.  The neighborhood where she grew up has since been razed and paved over, but the poet recalls the way the old perils affected the child and the woman.

Like other children, she was taught not to eat poisonous plants - lily of the valley, hemlock - 

But she didn't learn that the swallow's nest,
the frog, the mud-dauber wasp nest, the milk from cows,
the white-tailed deer, the catfish were full of hot particles.
Her father brought out the Geiger counter to measure
her snowmen and teach her the snow, too, wasn't
safe enough to taste.

As a child, 

She knows the click of the Geiger counter
better than her own heart, which moans
and swings unlike any machine.

Her father's Geiger counter click-clicked
its swaying tongue at me.

Her mother worries that she is becoming morbid:

... the girl hides underground, pretending
to be a troll or a witch, She puts leaves in her hair
and collects fossils, lining them up to spell words,
the swirling trilobite, the imprints of the mysterious dead.

As an adult, she tells of the aftermath of nuclear disasters in Chernobyl and Fukushima, where "Sunflowers planted in hope, in the name of the dead / fail to purify the earth... Still, they are tended." Ordinary landscapes become shifted and exotic with "blue glass butterflies born eyeless," and where "metal faces of new radiation detection signs / appear next to the crumpled worn idols of stone."

These stone idols may turn our thoughts to Shelley's "Ozymandias."  "Tickling the Dragon" evokes W. H. Auden's "Musee des Beaux Arts."  "About suffering they were never wrong," says Auden, showing us Breughel's painting of Icarus falling into the sea: a cosmic catastrophe that is virtually ignored by the townspeople.  

Gailey replaces the Auden's "Old Masters" with "old comics," showing us a comic, line-drawing of a very real and catastrophic accident involving a scientist whose hubris caused him to use a screwdriver in an experiment with deadly beryllium and plutonium. His gruesome death by radiation, like the bravado of Icarus, is now an everyday accommodation to reality: man can not, unaided, touch the sky, or the atom: "After this, they began to use robots; / they wanted to find a way to keep a man's hands / from touching the demon core of this dragon."  Either way, however, the small and invisible can be humanity's undoing.

These poems are funny and matter-of -fact, filled with imagery and plain, down-to-earth and science-fictional. They are both haunting and interesting. I am very glad to have been given the opportunity to discover them.

Thank you to Serena Agusto-Cox of Poetic Book Tours and Savvy Verse and Wit for inviting me to participate in the blog tour for The Robot Scientist's Daughter. You can read more about the poet and the poetry at Jeannine Hall Gailey's site.

never again

21 March 2015

At the water's edge

At the Water's EdgeAt the Water's Edge by Sara Gruen
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

The proprietor of a Scottish loch-side inn, the men and women who work there, the townspeople who keep the faith during the dark times of WWII: these are well-drawn, real characters whose survival matters deeply to the reader. Their folklore (including the Loch Ness Monster), their remedies for everything from seasickness to the devastation of domestic violence, their soups and teas - these illuminate personalities of a terrified, but far from fractured community.

Unfortunately, these are secondary characters, used as backdrop for three Americans whose heedlessness, selfishness, casual cruelty, snobbishness, and backbiting are only a hair's breath from cartoonish. A young, married couple is disinherited by insular, callous parents. They and an equally callow friend go to the Loch to film (by any means necessary) the Monster, which the beastly father had filmed - falsely - years before. The two men mistreat everyone they come across - except, possibly, each other - and the woman, left behind at the inn for days at a time, grows a soul.

There are love stories mixed in here, some of which engage the reader. There is so much backstory in the first third of the book that the reader may despair of finding the thread of a worthy plot.  There are glimpses of what the real war has done to real people, both military and civilian, and there is hope - because the reader knows the outcome of the war.

Disappointing, but worth two stars for the heart and soul of the small town that takes in three hapless Americans.

I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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01 March 2015

Doll God

In the realm of the Doll God by Luanne Castle, intention is not limited to the usual actors. Nesting dolls may choose to share Snow White's casket. The old, life-sized toddler doll, denied a little girl's ability to say "No," may force the beholder to read her history in chill, stony eyes ("See how it was for me, my history"). In "A Bone Elegy," a poem that refers to surgery on a "ravenous tumor" on the foot of the poet, a mother's voice is "a clothesline/heavy with soggy laundry" as the poet remembers a visit to the shore, where "the wind stirring up/ the waves/ goosebumped my arms." Dolls and their homes, and the objects in those homes, challenge the reader to examine the transcendent issues of love, loss, beauty, presence, absence ("because absence has its variations").

"God's toolbox begets stained glass," she says, hinting at both beauty and danger. You will "see the sky's floor crack open in one poem; in another, the sky is "so blue it hisses." Even the peace of a mother knitting in golden lamplight while listening to Nancy Wilson is transient, as a girl, "whose blood is "buzzing through/ its gridded network," well knows: "Anything could unbalance it./ An extra star in tomorrow's sky, rain/ or no rain/ could re-set it all."

I particularly loved the poem, "Prospective Ghost's Response to the First Duino Elegy," in which Castle tells the Master, "I am still looking for angels," and tells of possible encounters with ghosts who appear to her as sensations.
Ghost animals skirt my ankles.
I could be in love with them or their shadows.
Now, I sit on the ledge watching
terror as it creeps and insinuates
into everything that is life or the world...
Rilke himself might have told her that "...the wind/ full of outer space/ gnaws at our lifted faces.." or that "...many stars lined up/ hoping you'd notice."  He might have told her to show the angel "how even the wail of sorrow/ can settle purely/ into its own form..." -

- but Castle knows that, as she has created art from artifacts of childhood, and from the ancient teaching-tales of humanity. As proof, one more quote, from Snow Remembers an Old Tale:
From that other screen
once upon that time
a girl crawled out at night to dance
in aisles of cornfields
from Mayday to Halloween.
In a guest post on Peeking Between the Pages, Luanne Castle recently wrote
Because I grew up with the imaginary world of dolls, I can't see a doll that doesn't inspire me for a poem Often my imagination will transform the doll into a magical portal through which to see more of the human heart.

Need I say that I loved this book? It has everything poetry can offer, from stunning imagery and metaphors to a storyline that encompasses the search for meaning and identity. 

Thank you to Serena Agusto-Cox of Poetic Book Tours and Savvy Verse and Wit for inviting me to participate in the blog tour for Doll God.You can read more about the book on Ms. Castle's site, here, and read more reviews on Goodreads, here.

17 February 2015

in memoriam

In memoriam - John Savage, former director of the North Babylon Public Library, who died in late December. He taught us all by example witih his strong sense of ethics, his intellectual curiosity, his desire to make changes that would benefit the public good as well as the individual iconoclast, and his old-fashioned caring. Thank you, Mr. Savage.

His obituary is here.