28 July 2009

Teaser Tuesday

TEASER TUESDAYS is hosted by ShouldBeReading and asks you to:

♠Grab your current read.
♠Let the book fall open to a random page.
♠Share with us two (2) “teaser” sentences from that page.
♠You also need to share the title of the book that you’re getting your “teaser” from … that way people can have some great book recommendations if they like the teaser you’ve given!
Please avoid spoilers!

My teaser:

"When he sensed Emily was about to speak, Dury said, "Do not ask what it is about," becore she could in fact ask. Dury felt his face turning red with embarrassment as he remembered that Lysistrata featured a group of women who agreed to deny their husbands the pleasures of the bed until they stopped fighting a war."

from p. 147 of Emily's Ghost: a novel of the Bronte sisters by Denise Giardina.






9 comments:

celi.a said...

Hmmm...the sentences seem to go in very different directions. I'll have to read more now and find out why that is. Great teaser!

Check out mine here.

jlshall said...

Nice teaser! The Bronte sisters always make wonderful subjects for novels - I may have to take a look at this one.

Amy said...

Ooo, I just ordered that book! How is it?

Marie Burton said...

Love the premise, great teaser.

Daphne said...

Teaser, indeed! And I love the cover. And the title. And the Brontes!

avisannschild said...

I really want to read this book! I'm looking forward to your review.

Denise~ said...

Not exactly a teaser but...
In the evenings I’m reading Rushdie’s Enchantress of Florence. But of a morning I’m reading Shelia Bender’s Keeping a Journal You Love.

In this morning’s reading the author of Keeping a Journal You Love is discussing travel journals and quotes a fiction writer’s travel journal back to her childhood home in Mexico in the following passage:

…Catholic homes often have private shrines inside, and the idea of a personal library seemed even more private and interior to me. Perhaps, in our Protestant subculture, a love of learning had replaced faith in the institution of the Catholic Church.
It had not exactly been off-limits to us as children, but we were not supposed to bother Franscisco if he was working in his combination library/studio. With five children plus their friends and cousins, this was probably a matter of survival. Still it retained an air of the tantalizingly forbidden, which I was to use for a library in my novel…


Interesting isn’t it? Not just her look back as an adult to the forbidden room of her childhood but the notion that learning had replaced faith. Private shrines replaced by private libraries.

I believe this to be the opposite in America today. So much of our everyday American culture has replaced learning with religion. Maybe it’s just a southern thing – but so many people of faith today read fluff or new-vein religious fiction never the literature of old. How many people do you know that have read the Left Behind series but not Brothers Karamozov?

KSD said...

Ooooooh --- if only my Kindle would fall open to a random page. . .

Carrie K said...

Interesting premise, promising sentences.

Hmm. I've read neither the Left Behind books or Bros Karamozoz. I'm an illiterate heathen mayhap? ;)